IT (1987) by Stephen King

UPDATE I have finally finished reading IT about a week before the movie premieres and I cannot contain my excitement.


★★★★★ 5/5

IMG_2834To the children, the town was their whole world. To the adults, knowing better, Derry, Maine was just their home town: familiar, well-ordered for the most part. A good place to live. It was the children who saw – and felt – what made Derry so horribly different. In the storm drains, in the sewers, IT lurked, taking on the shape of every nightmare, each one’s deepest dread. Sometimes IT reached up, seizing, tearing, killing . . .
The adults, knowing better, knew nothing.Time passed and the children grew up, moved away. The horror of IT was deep-buried, wrapped in forgetfulness. Until they were called back, once more to confront IT as IT stirred and coiled in the sullen depths of their memories, reaching up again to make their past nightmares a terrible present reality.
  – Goodreads


Horror/Thriller/Fantasy – a lengthy read, but worth every word.

There is no denying this is the best book I have ever read. I am usually picky about long books, but this book required every detail and was executed perfectly. I never wanted it to end.

The main characters being the seven kids; Bill, Ben, Beverly, Eddie, Mike, Richie, and Stan. My favorites were definitely Bill and Eddie, my least favorite being Richie (Beep, Beep).

Stephen King’s writing style is just as enjoyable as the story itself, I loved how gracefully he transitioned from the present setting to the memories. The aspect of the adults remembering everything slowly instead of all at once and presenting this as memories added to the suspense and the foreshadowing.

What makes Stephen King so amazing is that he has all these creative ideas and a wild imagination and he can really create a visual image that is equally as amazing as it is terrifying.

Of course, I can’t say too much because I want to keep my reviews spoiler free, but EVERYONE has to read this masterpiece. I am going to watch the old film before the movie release on September 8th!

"I'm doing the Mashed Potatoes all over it and I got a broken arm!"
"In nightmares we can think the worst. That's what they're for, I guess."
"There was blood ... blood everywhere ... and her father didn't see it."

 

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Louis Zamperini

I am still working on a finalized banner


For today’s segment of me, myself, and Mondays I am going to introduce you to my hero – Louis Zamperini. For all my literature friends, he has several books and here are just a couple of my favorites!

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Don’t Give Up, Don’t Give In by Louis Zamperini and David Rensin (his “lessons from an extraordinary life”)

Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand (which is also a MOVIE!!!)

Louis Zamperini is a worthy hero in many ways. He has been my motivation and my idol when it comes to running. Whenever I am participating in a race I always remember a saying he lived by; “One moment of pain is worth a lifetime of glory.”

Louis Zamperini’s story really is extraordinary, and it is hard to believe that such a human lived in this world. I do not want to spoil the movie or the books in case I have sparked interest in any of my viewers, so I will give you Goodreads synopsis of the Unbroken book.


On a May afternoon in 1943, an Army Air Forces bomber crashed into the Pacific Ocean and disappeared, leaving only a spray of debris and a slick of oil, gasoline, and blood. Then, on the ocean surface, a face appeared. It was that of a young lieutenant, the plane’s bombardier, who was struggling to a life raft and pulling himself aboard. So began one of the most extraordinary odysseys of the Second World War.

The lieutenant’s name was Louis Zamperini. In boyhood, he’d been a cunning and incorrigible delinquent, breaking into houses, brawling, and fleeing his home to ride the rails. As a teenager, he had channeled his defiance into running, discovering a prodigious talent that had carried him to the Berlin Olympics and within sight of the four-minute mile. But when war had come, the athlete had become an airman, embarking on a journey that led to his doomed flight, a tiny raft, and a drift into the unknown.

Ahead of Zamperini lay thousands of miles of open ocean, leaping sharks, a foundering raft, thirst and starvation, enemy aircraft, and, beyond, a trial even greater. Driven to the limits of endurance, Zamperini would answer desperation with ingenuity; suffering with hope, resolve, and humor; brutality with rebellion. His fate, whether triumph or tragedy, would be suspended on the fraying wire of his will.

In her long-awaited new book, Laura Hillenbrand writes with the same rich and vivid narrative voice she displayed in Seabiscuit. Telling an unforgettable story of a man’s journey into extremity, Unbroken is a testament to the resilience of the human mind, body, and spirit.


Let me know if you have or plan on reading his books or watching his movie!

Ten Reads to Tackle

I have just under 20 books to read in order to meet my 2017 reading goal of 50 books. It is almost September so I decided that hey maybe I should start considering a few books that I want to tackle.

Making a TBR list when I have over a 100 unread books on the bookshelf (overload) is a difficult task. Therefore I went through my books and picked out a few that I was excited to read. I didn’t want to make a static TBR for the next 4 months just in case I get an urge to read another book or I get my hands on another one I am excited for so I decided to choose 10 must-reads for my 2017 reading goal:

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The Giver – Lois Lowry

Fahrenheit 451 – Ray Bradbury

The Shining – Stephen King

Life of Pi – Yann Martel

Tuesdays with Morrie – Mitch Albom

The Time Traveller’s Wife – Audrey Niffenegger

The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown

A Little Life – Hanya Yanagihara

The Hate U Give – Angie Thomas

Vengeance Road – Erin Bowman


Do you have any must-reads before the year is over? Let me know! 

August Book Haul

Still trying to figure out my book haul banner, any tips?

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I found all of these at a secondhand store, 6 books for 14 dollars!! I am all about those thrift finds.

Ender’s Game – Orson Scott Card

Shadow of the Hegemon – Orson Scott Card

Cat’s Eye – Margaret Atwood

A Walk to Remember – Nicholas Sparks

The War of The Worlds – H.G. Wells

Hatchet – Gary Paulson

 

New Blog Segment !!

Introducing…

Me, Myself, & Mondays

My first blog “installation” is a work in progress. I wanted to start small in order to learn how to manage scheduled posts and follow a theme on my blog.

From here on out on Monday of each week I will publish a post that has a personal touch to it. I will keep it literature related for the most part, but sometimes I will just give a little dose of me!

Me, Myself, and Mondays will allow me to have a little fun with my weekly posts as well as give my reader’s a little more insight into the person I am. On top of being able to interact more personally with my blog, I am able to start really giving my blog a structure in order to build a solid base and continue to grow!

I am also open to taking any requests for post ideas!!

The Nest (2015) by Kevin Oppell

★★★★☆ 4/5

For some kids summer is a sun-soaked season of fun. But for Steve, it’s just another season of worries. Worries about his sick newborn baby brother who is fighting to survive, worries about his parents who are struggling to cope, even worries about the wasp’s nest looming ominously from the eaves. So when a mysterious wasp queen invades his dreams, offering to “fix” the baby, Steve thinks his prayers have been answered. – Goodreads


Horror/Fiction/YA – read on Kobo Ereader

Writing a good review for this read was a little difficult because I only use my Kobo when I am at the gym during cardio sessions! This should-be quick read probably lasted close to a month for me, but regardless I loved it.

This read has sometimes been referred to as a children’s book, other times a young adult. In my personal opinion, to really grasp the subjects in this book the reader would need to be old or mature enough to understand the pressure placed on a family in circumstances where a family member is sick.

It is hard to give an honest review without spoiling anything, so I will sum it up with saying the reason this book was so great was that it kept the “supernatural” horror alive and real, while simultaneously addressing the natural horrors that can be encountered in life and managed to tie them together. Two forms of horror working as one keeps the reader on edge and curious right up until the very last word, and the fear even continues to linger afterwards.

"But maybe Vanessa was right, and all those other people were broken 
too in their own ways, maybe we all spent too much time pretending
we weren't."

 

The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890) by Oscar Wilde

★★★☆☆ 3/5

Written in his distinctively dazzling manner, Oscar Wilde’s story of a fashionable young man who sells his soul for eternal youth and beauty is the author’s most popular work. The tale of Dorian Gray’s moral disintegration caused a scandal when it first appeared in 1890, but though Wilde was attacked for the novel’s corrupting influence, he responded that there is, in fact, “a terrible moral in Dorian Gray.” Just a few years later, the book and the aesthetic/moral dilemma it presented became issues in the trials occasioned by Wilde’s homosexual liaisons, which resulted in his imprisonment. Of Dorian Gray’s relationship to autobiography, Wilde noted in a letter, “Basil Hallward is what I think I am: Lord Henry what the world thinks me: Dorian what I would like to be—in other ages, perhaps.” -Goodreads


Classics/Fiction/Horror – can be read in a few days

Written in Old English language, this read was not only entertaining for the story, the brilliant quotes worded beautifully are reason enough to give this book a try. Lord Henry had many wise words about life, I couldn’t even pick a favorite quote.

I was tempted to give it 4 stars, however there was a stretch in the book where I was very confused and missed a significant amount of time. I was still able to understand the general plot of the story, but it did impact my rating of the book. I’m sure if I reread this book I would be able to appreciate it much more.

REGARDLESS – IT IS A MASTERPIECE. 

I definitely had the homosexual vibe from Basil which contributed to the controversy over this book.

In the book Basil keeps emphasizing that he feels he have put too much of himself into the portrait he painted of Dorian, this could be Oscar Wilde’s metaphor for how he has put much of himself into this book when he references that each character is semi autobiographical

“Those who find ugly meanings in beautiful things are corrupt without being charming. This is a fault.”

"Because to influence a person is to give him one's own soul."
"Youth is one thing worth having."
"Humanity takes itself too seriously. It is the world's original sin. If the
caveman had known had to laugh, History would have been different."