A Man Called Ove (2012) by Fredrik Backman

★★★★☆ 4/5

Behind the cranky exterior there is a story and a sadness. So when one November morning a chatty young couple with two chatty young daughters move in next door and accidentally flatten Ove’s mailbox, it is the lead-in to a comical and heartwarming tale of unkempt cats, unexpected friendship, and the ancient art of backing up a U-Haul. All of which will change one cranky old man and a local residents’ association to their very foundations. -Goodreads


Fiction/ <500 Pages / Can be read in about a week 

This book was on the top of my TBR for a very long time, you can imagine my disappointment when I started this book and I didn’t think it was for me – but, I was very wrong.

Ove comes off as a bitter old man, however readers get to learn about what has happened throughout his life and how he feels, and it really influences you to be more open minded when perceiving Ove.

There was such great character development and I fell in love with the story very quickly. One minute I would be crying and the next I would be laughing out loud.

This read was great because it reminds the reader that everyone has a history which has shaped them into who they are today. Ove’s actions and perceptions are heavily based upon the influence of the important people he had in his life.

"Ove feels an instinctive skepticism towards all people taller than one 
eighty-five; the blood can't quite make it all the way up to the brain."

"And she was colour. All the colour he had."

The Martian (2011) by Andy Weir

★★★★★ 5/5

Processed with VSCO with hb1 presetAfter a dust storm nearly kills him and forces his crew to evacuate the planet while thinking him dead, Mark finds himself stranded on Mars’ surface, completely alone, with no way to signal Earth that he’s alive. And even if he could get word out, his supplies would be gone years before a rescue could arrive. – Goodreads

 

 

 


Science Fiction / <500 Pages / Medium Difficulty read – because of the science aspect.

I couldn’t resist giving this 5 stars, I am a huge space nerd and I am doing an undergraduate degree in Geology – so I loved every minute of this read.

I seen a book about an astronaut, of course I had to buy it. I snagged it at a huge book fair for just two dollars!

Yes, there is a huge science aspect to this story, but it is not long winded and it is explained in simple terms. I think that even if you do not have a strong background in science that you can enjoy this book if science interests you at all!

I was in suspense the whole read. I loved how funny Mark Watney was, I’m glad I read this story from a character who was hopeful, innovative, and hilarious. If I would of had to read this from a character who was complaining or felt doomed the whole time, well I probably wouldn’t of read very much.

The novel is set up into astronaut logs and conferences at NASA, the set up makes the read flow great and builds suspense.

This read was perfect for me.

"Mars is a barren wasteland and I am completely alone here. I already knew
that, of course. But there is a difference between knowing it and really experiencing it. 
All around me there was nothing but dust, rocks, and endless empty desert in 
all directions. The planet's famous red color is from iron oxide coating everything. 
So it's not just a desert. It's a desert so old it's literally rusting."

 

The Book Thief (2005) by Markus Zusak

★★★★★ 5/5

Processed with VSCO with hb1 presetIt is 1939. Nazi Germany. The country is holding its breath. Death has never been busier, and will become busier still. By her brother’s graveside, Liesel’s life is changed when she picks up an object, partially hidden in the snow. It is ‘The Gravedigger’s Handbook,’ and it is her first act of book thievery. So begins a love affair with books and words, as Liesel learns to read. Soon she is stealing books from Nazi book-burnings, the mayor’s wife’s library, wherever there are books to be found. But these are dangerous times. When Liesel’s foster family hides a Jewish fist-fighter in their basement, Liesel’s world is both opened up, and closed down. – Goodreads


Historical Fiction / WWII / Classics / >500 pages / Takes time, but an easy read 

The author has 3 ways to win you over, introducing the narrator as death interests you from the start, the unique and fun writing style keeps the read interesting, and then once the story unfolds you are bound to fall in love with the characters and the story consumes you.

I have seen praises for this book all over social media, and then my cousin recommended it to me so it was on my TBR list for a while. I found someone selling it for 5 DOLLARS so I just had to

LOVE historical fiction, and I am fascinated with world war II. However, you don’t need to be a history fanatic to follow this story. Of course, Hitler’s influence at this time in Germany is important to the setting, but the story itself can be followed and loved just with that general knowledge and any extra historical information the author may provide. If you are not a fan of history, you can definitely still enjoy this book.

My favorite aspect of this book is the point of view in history. Often when reading about WWII whether it be fiction or  non-fiction, it is from the point of view of the Jewish victims, or the Allied powers. There is not usually stories told from a German perspective, especially not German civilians. This story is important for showing the perspective of the people who lived in Germany at this time in history, and reminding everyone that there were still good people.

For me, this book reminding me to have faith in humanity, because even in the worst of times, there are still good people.

"You don't always get what you wish for. Especially in Nazi Germany."